Tuesday, October 27, 2020

Book Review | Women's Weird: Strange Stories by Women, 1890-1940 edited by Melissa Edmundson

Women's Weird: Strange Stories by Women, 1890-1940 edited by Melissa Edmundson

Early Weird fiction embraces the supernatural, horror, science fiction, fantasy and the Gothic, and was explored with enthusiasm by many women writers in the United Kingdom and in the USA. Melissa Edmundson has brought together a compelling collection of the best Weird short stories by women from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, to thrill new readers and delight these authors' fans.

I'm fascinated by the history of horror, and I love reading old stories by authors like Algernon Blackwood, H.G. Wells, Arthur Machen, and Lovecraft. With the exception of Edith Wharton and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, I haven't read many weird tales written by women. I'm absolutely loving that these old stories are being talked about via publications like Monster, She Wrote and being reprinted in books like Women's Weird (the book I'm reviewing here) and Women's Weird 2 from Handheld Press and the upcoming Weird Tales book from Valancourt Books. I am in my happy place here, and this volume of stories is a GIFT.

Women's Weird begins with a lengthy introduction into weird fiction and the history of strange stories by women. This leads into a list of books for further reading about weird fiction and its authors, a biography on each of the women in Women's Weird, and the bibliographical information for each of the stories in Women's Weird. It's such a treasure. I didn't realize until I was finished with the last story that there is a glossary of terms for each story at the back of the book as well.

As for the stories themselves, this anthology is filled with ghosts and unexplained deaths, and I absolutely loved it. I'm pretty sure I had only read the first line of the first story before I was already looking up and ordering the collection that story first appeared in in 1895. I was blown away by Baldwin's story ("The Weird of the Walfords") and the rest of the stories that followed in Women's Weird. Fair warning - Edith Wharton's story "Kerfol" contains animal cruelty, but I loved that story as well.

I'm looking forward to hunting down more stories from all of these women, but first I'm going to read the next book in this series - Women's Weird 2: More Strange Stories by Women, 1891-1937 - which happens to be out today!

If you are a fan of the old Weird Tales stories or you love a great literary ghost story, do yourself a favor and pick up a copy of Women's Weird. Horror has such incredible women in its history; I would love nothing more than to know these tales were getting the audience they deserve.

⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
5/5 stars

Review copy provided by the publisher

Jennifer

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Monday, October 12, 2020

Book Review | Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas

Catherine House is horror/thriller novel by Elisabeth Thomas.

Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas

A story about a dangerously curious young undergraduate whose rebelliousness leads her to discover a shocking secret involving an exclusive circle of students . . . and the dark truth beneath her school’s promise of prestige.

You are in the house and the house is in the woods.
You are in the house and the house is in you . . .

Catherine House is a school of higher learning like no other. Hidden deep in the woods of rural Pennsylvania, this crucible of reformist liberal arts study with its experimental curriculum, wildly selective admissions policy, and formidable endowment, has produced some of the world’s best minds: prize-winning authors, artists, inventors, Supreme Court justices, presidents. For those lucky few selected, tuition, room, and board are free. But acceptance comes with a price. Students are required to give the House three years—summers included—completely removed from the outside world. Family, friends, television, music, even their clothing must be left behind. In return, the school promises its graduates a future of sublime power and prestige, and that they can become anything or anyone they desire.

Among this year’s incoming class is Ines, who expects to trade blurry nights of parties, pills, cruel friends, and dangerous men for rigorous intellectual discipline—only to discover an environment of sanctioned revelry. The school’s enigmatic director, ViktΓ³ria, encourages the students to explore, to expand their minds, to find themselves and their place within the formidable black iron gates of Catherine.

For Ines, Catherine is the closest thing to a home she’s ever had, and her serious, timid roommate, Baby, soon becomes an unlikely friend. Yet the House’s strange protocols make this refuge, with its worn velvet and weathered leather, feel increasingly like a gilded prison. And when Baby’s obsessive desire for acceptance ends in tragedy, Ines begins to suspect that the school—in all its shabby splendor, hallowed history, advanced theories, and controlled decadence—might be hiding a dangerous agenda that is connected to a secretive, tightly knit group of students selected to study its most promising and mysterious curriculum.


Catherine House was recently chosen as a group read in the Ladies of Horror Fiction Goodreads group. I didn't manage to read it during the chosen month so I'm doing a little catch up now!

I listened to Catherine House on audio, and the narration was excellent. The narrator made this book so easy to follow despite how vague the story was. I loved the atmosphere, and I loved the school setting.

Overall, though, Catherine House didn't work very well for me. I feel like this year has been filled with ambiguous entertainment, and I am more than craving some straight forward stories right now. I think Catherine House will work best for those who like to read deeper and find the artistic meaning behind what is and isn't said.

⭐⭐★★★
2/5 stars

Jennifer

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Sunday, October 11, 2020

Recent Updates and Currently Reading | October 11

I am really ready for hurricane season to be over! We got hit with another hurricane this week. This time we rode it out at home. We were only supposed to get tropical storm force winds in our area, but the weather folks got it wrong. There is no end to the gifts of 2020.

Finished Reading



I finished listening to Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas. I'll have my review posted tomorrow. ⭐⭐★★★

Currently Reading


The Return by Rachel Harrison Women's Weird edited by Melissa Edmundson

I'm still reading The Return by Rachel Harrison and Women's Weird edited by Melissa Edmundson. I'm enjoying them both.


Added to the TBR


Over the Woodward Wall by A. Deborah Baker The Hollow Places by T. Kingfisher Helena by Claire L. Smith

Over the Woodward Wall by A. Deborah Baker (aka Seanan McGuire) and The Hollow Places by T. Kingfisher were both preorders that were released this week. I'm really looking forward to reading both of them!

Many thanks to CLASH Books for sending me a copy of Helena by Claire L. Smith. Helena releases this week!


So what about you? Let me know what you're reading (or watching) this week or leave me some links!


This post is being shared as part of Book Date's It's Monday! What Are You Reading? and Caffeinated Book Reviewer's The Sunday Post.

Jennifer

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Sunday, October 4, 2020

Recent Updates and Currently Reading | October 4

Were you able to see Mars next to the full moon this weekend? We set up our outdoor movie screen last night, and Mars looked incredible! I spent half the time watching the movie (and eating smores πŸ˜‹) and half the time watching Mars.

Posted Last Week



Finished Reading


Dread Nation by Justina Ireland The Midnight Lullaby by Cheryl Low

I finished reading Dread Nation by Justina Ireland. My ⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«★ review has been posted.

I also read The Midnight Lullaby by Cheryl Low. I loved it, and posted a review for it as well. ⭐⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«

Currently Reading


The Return by Rachel Harrison Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas Women's Weird edited by Melissa Edmundson

I'm in the mood for thriller/horror this month so I picked up The Return by Rachel Harrison. I'm enjoying it so far. I can't wait to find out what is happening in this one.

I started listening to Catherine House by Elisabeth Thomas. The narration is amazing, but the plot is lacking.

I also started reading Women's Weird edited by Melissa Edmundson, and it's amazing! I have a feeling I'm going to love this series.


So what about you? Let me know what you're reading (or watching) this week or leave me some links!


This post is being shared as part of Book Date's It's Monday! What Are You Reading? and Caffeinated Book Reviewer's The Sunday Post.

Jennifer

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Tuesday, September 29, 2020

Book Review | The Midnight Lullaby by Cheryl Low

The Midnight Lullaby is a horror novella by Cheryl Low.

Everybody has secrets…

For years, Benedict Lyon has been living a lie. Not even his family knows the truth he's been keeping from the world. Only Emmeline knows his secret—and she's dead.

…some are darker than others…

When the matriarch of the Lyon family passes away, Benedict is summoned home for the funeral. Emmeline urges Benedict not to go, certain that if he returns to that house, neither one of them will escape.

…but are they worth dying for?

Their presence in the family home causes the spirit of Gloria Lyon to become restless, and as the remaining members of the Lyon family attempt to put their mother to rest, long buried secrets, some deadlier than others, are unearthed. Who will survive…

The Midnight Lullaby.


Thank you to Tammy for putting this novella on my radar! (And thank you to Grinning Skull Press for sending me out a copy for review!)

Ghosts have always been my favorite horror element so I get really excited when I read a ghostly book that brings something new to the table. The Midnight Lullaby did just that! I don't want to spoil anything for you, though. At 165 pages, The Midnight Lullaby escalates quickly!

This was my first book by Cheryl Low, but I'm definitely going to go back and pick up Infernal.

We are at the beginning of spooky season, and we are all going to be spending a lot more time at home this year. The Midnight Lullaby is on my list of books that I recommend you add to your horror pile this fall.

⭐⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«
4.5/5 stars

Jennifer

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Monday, September 28, 2020

Book Review | Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

Dread Nation is a YA historical fiction/horror novel by Justina Ireland.

Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

Jane McKeene was born two days before the dead began to walk the battlefields of Gettysburg and Chancellorsville—derailing the War Between the States and changing America forever. In this new nation, safety for all depends on the work of a few, and laws like the Native and Negro Reeducation Act require certain children attend combat schools to learn to put down the dead. But there are also opportunities—and Jane is studying to become an Attendant, trained in both weaponry and etiquette to protect the well-to-do. It’s a chance for a better life for Negro girls like Jane. After all, not even being the daughter of a wealthy white Southern woman could save her from society’s expectations.

But that’s not a life Jane wants. Almost finished with her education at Miss Preston’s School of Combat in Baltimore, Jane is set on returning to her Kentucky home and doesn’t pay much mind to the politics of the eastern cities, with their talk of returning America to the glory of its days before the dead rose. But when families around Baltimore County begin to go missing, Jane is caught in the middle of a conspiracy, one that finds her in a desperate fight for her life against some powerful enemies. And the restless dead, it would seem, are the least of her problems.


Even though this is a zombie book, I knew going into Dread Nation that it would be light on the horror elements. I think that helped me adjust to the right expectations going into this. Thankfully there was a more to Dread Nation than the zombies.

Dread Nation was very successful at building the story over the course of the entire novel. I love when a book gets better and better and then thoroughly hooks me by the end. That doesn't always make for a quick read, and it did take me a while to get through Dread Nation. I was able to put it down and pick it back up again days later.

By the end, though, I was hooked and anxious for more. I'll be picking up Deathless Divide (the second half of this duology) soon so be on the look out for that review as well!

⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«★
3.5/5 stars

Jennifer

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Thursday, September 10, 2020

Book Review | The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones

The Only Good Indians is a horror novel from Stephen Graham Jones. 

The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones

Seamlessly blending classic horror and a dramatic narrative with sharp social commentary, The Only Good Indians follows four American Indian men after a disturbing event from their youth puts them in a desperate struggle for their lives. Tracked by an entity bent on revenge, these childhood friends are helpless as the culture and traditions they left behind catch up to them in a violent, vengeful way.
I love how you just don't know what to expect when reading one of Stephen Graham Jones' books. I'm also going to be posting a review of his The Night of the Mannequins novella soon, and I will be reiterating the same thing. His writing is unpredictable in the best of ways.

This may have been the wrong time for me to read The Only Good Indians, though. It was confusing, and my current attention span may have made it even harder for me to pay attention overall.

I'm such a fan of Stephen Graham Jones, and I will continue to read whatever he writes. Even though I'm middle of the road on The Only Good Indians, I still want to encourage people to pick it up - especially folks who are already fans.

Here are some of the early reviews that I loved and think you should check out:
 
⭐⭐⭐★★
 
Review copy provided by the publisher 

Jennifer

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Monday, September 7, 2020

Book Review | All That's Fair by S.H. Cooper

All That's Fair is a horror short story collection by S.H. Cooper. 


A maiden looking for love in all the wrong places.

A mother in an endless search for missing children.

A crone whose passing is marked by the tinkling of tiny bells.

All That’s Fair is a collection of twenty-two short horror stories themed around women who are made up of anything but sugar, spice, and everything nice. Be they human, ghost, or something else entirely, one thing holds true for all: These are not the girls you’ll find (or want) next door.

All That's Fair contains 22 horror short stories. These short stories really are short which helped make All That's Fair a fun book to fly through. Several of Cooper's stories made me think this would be a great collection for adults like me who grew up loving the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark volumes.

Don't get me wrong in my comparison to Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. The comparison fits because she has such a fun storytelling style that I love, but her stories are also disturbing.

After loving her novella The Festering Ones {my review}, I jumped at the opportunity to read All That's Fair, and I'm so glad that I did.

My favorite stories in the collection were The O'Sullivan Song, Twelve Hands, The Crone's Woods, The Wishing Sisters, and The Hardest Lesson.

⭐⭐⭐⭐★

Content warning: suicide

Review copy provided by the author

Jennifer

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Sunday, September 6, 2020

Recent Updates and Currently Reading | September 6

Well, my return to blogging was short lived! I posted an update 2 weeks ago, and the next day they called a mandatory evacuation due to Hurricane Laura. I was out of my home for the next 8 days, and our A/C was out for another few days. Our trees took a beating, but the house and my family are fine otherwise! I'm doubly behind on reviews now, but that's the way this year is insisting on going. I'm happy to be back. Again.

Finished Reading


The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James

I finished reading All That's Fair by S.H. Cooper. It was a great collection, and I'll have a review posted for it tomorrow. ⭐⭐⭐⭐★

I also read The Sun Down Motel by Simone St. James which was another 4 star read! ⭐⭐⭐⭐★

Currently Reading


The Midnight Lullaby by Cheryl Low

I'm still reading and enjoying Dread Nation by Justina Ireland.

I also started reading The Midnight Lullaby by Cheryl Low, and I'm loving it so far.

Recently Watched


La Llorona
I'll Be Gone in the Dark Mermaid Down You're Killing Me Braid I'm Thinking of Ending Things

La Llorona was more of a drama than a horror movie. It was OK. ⭐⭐⭐★★

I watched the I'll Be Gone in the Dark series. If you've read the book, I recommend watching the show as well. It gives a lot of insight into Michelle McNamara and her obsession with the Golden State Killer. ⭐⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«

Even though the reviews weren't very good, I had some hopes for Mermaid Down. I love mermaids and ocean horror so I was willing to give it a chance. Wow, the film makers tried to put every idea they had into this one movie.  ⭐⭐★★★

The Ladies of Horror Fiction team is hosting movie nights every Friday night this month if you'd like to join us! We used You're Killing Me to test out the functionality of Amazon Watch Party the night before our first watch party. It was a perfect watch party movie. It was so ridiculous and a lot of fun! ⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«★

Braid was our first official watch party movie. I had seen it before, but I didn't remember much and was anxious to watch it again. It's a strange and beautiful movie. I recommend it.  ⭐⭐⭐⭐★

I'm Thinking of Ending Things: Every shot in this movie is beautiful and the cast is amazing, but I hate this movie. I was going to give it 1.5 stars, but the horribly long dance scene - and the rest that followed - stripped that final star down to nothing. What a weird disappointment. Kudos to those who can take something away from this. πŸ’«★★★★


So what about you? Let me know what you're reading (or watching) this week or leave me some links!


This post is being shared as part of Book Date's It's Monday! What Are You Reading? and Caffeinated Book Reviewer's The Sunday Post.

Jennifer

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Sunday, August 23, 2020

Recent Updates and Currently Reading | August 23

It's been quite a while since my last update. The life struggle is real right now. During my unfortunate but necessary hiatus, I've spent a lot of time thinking about my priorities and what can/needs to give in regards to reading and blogging and social media.

One change I think is finally permanent is no more review requests. I've said this in the past but have opened back up once I felt caught up and less committed. I've come to realize that I say yes when things are OK but those commitments come due in the future whether things are OK or not. So moving forward my only review copies will likely be women horror authors and those requests will go through the Ladies of Horror Fiction channels.

This past May I treated myself to a month of only personal reads and it was the best. That's really all I want from here on out.

Posted Since Last Update


Book Review | Blacktop Wasteland by S.A. Cosby

Book Review | Rules for Vanishing by Kate Alice Marshall

Book Review | Benny Rose, the Cannibal King by Hailey Piper

Finished Reading


The Bright Lands by John Fram The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones


I finished reading The Bright Lands by John Fram. Unfortunately it didn't really work for me.  ⭐⭐★★★

I recently read The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones. I struggled with this one, too, and I'm really bummed about it. I struggled writing my review, too, because I feel like my current frame of mind may have affected my ability to give this book the attention it needed. ⭐⭐⭐★★

I also read Night of the Mannequins by Stephen Graham Jones. I had more luck with this one!  ⭐⭐⭐⭐★


I started reading the Jessica Jones series that ran from 2016-2018. I'm enjoying it.

Currently Reading



 

I'm currently listening to The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo and loving it!

I'm also enjoying the stories in All That's Fair by S.H. Cooper!

I'm starting Dread Nation by Justina Ireland today as a buddy read with the Ladies of Horror Fiction team.

I will try to share the books I've bought and received recently as well as what I've been watching lately in my next update.


So what about you? Let me know what you're reading (or watching) this week or leave me some links!


This post is being shared as part of Book Date's It's Monday! What Are You Reading? and Caffeinated Book Reviewer's The Sunday Post.

Jennifer

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Monday, August 17, 2020

Book Review | Benny Rose, the Cannibal King by Hailey Piper

Benny Rose, the Cannibal King is a horror novella by Hailey Piper.


Blackwood, Vermont has one legend to its name—Benny Rose, the Cannibal King. Every local kid knows him and tells his stories, especially on Halloween. When a new girl moves to town in the autumn of 1987, the legend inspires high school junior Desiree St. Fleur and her friends to pull a Benny Rose-themed prank. A few laughs and screams, and they’ll have a Happy Halloween.

But a vicious storm crashes into Blackwood and interrupts the festivities. Soon the girls find themselves trapped and hunted in a strange neighborhood where no one will help them. There’s nothing made-up about Benny Rose this Halloween night. The truth is coming, and it's hungry.

Book 3 in the Rewind-or-Die series: imagine your local movie rental store back in the ’70s, ’80s, and ’90s, remember all those fantastic covers. Remember taking those movies home and watching in awe as the stories unfolded in nasty rainbows of gore, remember the atmosphere and textures. Remember the blood.

Benny Rose is another catch up review for me. It's been a couple of months since I read it, but I'm still happy to sing its praises.

Benny Rose is part of Unnerving's Rewind or Die series which I'm assuming are all written to play out like horror movies. This is the first of the Rewind or Die line that I've read, but I will definitely be picking up the rest of them.

Benny Rose is a gory, coming of age horror centered around an urban legend and a group of girls on Halloween. Is there a better way to spend your evening?

You don't need to wait until October to read this one, but if you haven't read it by the time October rolls around, it really is the perfect book to read for the Halloween season.

⭐⭐⭐⭐★

4/5 stars

Jennifer

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Tuesday, August 4, 2020

Book Review | Rules for Vanishing by Kate Alice Marshall

Rules for Vanishing is a young adult horror novel by Kate Alice Marshall.



In the faux-documentary style of The Blair Witch Project comes the campfire story of a missing girl, a vengeful ghost, and the girl who is determined to find her sister--at all costs.

Once a year, the path appears in the forest and Lucy Gallows beckons. Who is brave enough to find her--and who won't make it out of the woods?

It's been exactly one year since Sara's sister, Becca, disappeared, and high school life has far from settled back to normal. With her sister gone, Sara doesn't know whether her former friends no longer like her...or are scared of her, and the days of eating alone at lunch have started to blend together. When a mysterious text message invites Sara and her estranged friends to "play the game" and find local ghost legend Lucy Gallows, Sara is sure this is the only way to find Becca--before she's lost forever. And even though she's hardly spoken with them for a year, Sara finds herself deep in the darkness of the forest, her friends--and their cameras--following her down the path. Together, they will have to draw on all of their strengths to survive. The road is rarely forgiving, and no one will be the same on the other side.

I'm writing this review three months after having read Rules for Vanishing. Sometimes this can be a tough thing to do, but sometimes it helps me narrow down the things that really struck me and stayed with me.

In reading Rules for Vanishing, I was most excited for the creepy horrors. It reminded me a lot of when I read Kim Liggett's The Last Harvest. I love finding truly horrific scenes in a young adult book.

I also remember the ending being left up to interpretation. There was a definite ending, but it was an ambiguous one. Rules for Vanishing would make an excellent book club read. I wish I had been buddy reading it when I read it!

Rules for Vanishing is going on my list of automatic young adult horror recommendations. If you haven't had a chance to read it yet, I recommend you pick it up!

⭐⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«
4.5/5 stars

Jennifer

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020

Book Review | Blacktop Wasteland by S.A. Cosby

Blacktop Wasteland is a new crime fiction release by S.A. Cosby.

Blacktop Wasteland by S.A. Cosby

Beauregard “Bug” Montage is an honest mechanic, a loving husband, and a hard-working dad. Bug knows there’s no future in the man he used to be: known from the hills of North Carolina to the beaches of Florida as the best wheelman on the East Coast.

He thought he'd left all that behind him, but as his carefully built new life begins to crumble, he finds himself drawn inexorably back into a world of blood and bullets. When a smooth-talking former associate comes calling with a can't-miss jewelry store heist, Bug feels he has no choice but to get back in the driver's seat. And Bug is at his best where the scent of gasoline mixes with the smell of fear.

Haunted by the ghost of who he used to be and the father who disappeared when he needed him most, Bug must find a way to navigate this blacktop wasteland...or die trying.

Like Ocean’s Eleven meets Drive, with a Southern noir twist, S. A. Cosby’s Blacktop Wasteland is a searing, operatic story of a man pushed to his limits by poverty, race, and his own former life of crime.

Why Did I Read Blacktop Wasteland?


The early reviews have been amazing for Blacktop Wasteland! How could I not get pulled into wanting to read it? The majority of my friends have given it 5 stars and the rest a solid 4 stars.

The Strengths


I went into Blacktop Wasteland pretty blind outside of just knowing how well it was being received. Blacktop Wasteland turned out to be a really great crime novel. It was full of action and full of consequence, and I loved S.A. Cosby's voice.

Blacktop Wasteland had a lot of surprises, too. I'm certain I said "noooo" out loud more than once!

There was a lot of heart in Blacktop Wasteland. It makes me excited to see what Cosby does next.

The Weaknesses


Here is the part where I get purely subjective. Pretty early on I had Blacktop Wasteland pegged as a heist book. I am such a huge fan of heist stories, and I've been really craving them lately. I see now that Blacktop Wasteland is being billed as part Ocean's Eleven which is fair since my own mind went there (more specifically Ocean's Eight). I'm glad I didn't see the comparisons ahead of time, though, because my heist expectation would have been even higher. My mind kept expecting the plotting and the pacing of a heist novel but was being given a great crime novel that was something else altogether.

Final Thoughts


If you love a good crime story, I wholeheartedly recommend you pick up Blacktop Wasteland. I will not be surprised to see it on a lot of favorites and awards lists for this year.

⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«★
3.5/5 stars

Review copy provided by the publisher

Jennifer

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Sunday, July 12, 2020

Recent Updates and Currently Reading | July 12

I hope everyone is having an amazing weekend. Things have been really busy over at the Ladies of Horror Fiction and unfortunately that balances out to things being really quiet over here! Things will hopefully be semi back to normal next month, but in the mean time, please be sure to check out all these lists of nominees!!

LOHF Award Nominees for Best Collection
LOHF Award Nominees for Best Debut

LOHF Award Nominees for Best Poetry Collection
LOHF Award Nominees for Best Novel
LOHF Award Nominees for Best Novella

Stay tuned because we have more categories to announce this week.

Posted Since Last Update



Finished Reading


Home Before Dark by Riley Sager Blacktop Wasteland by S.A. Cosby

I finished reading Home Before Dark by Riley Sager. Hopefully I can put the finishing touches on my review today to post this week! ⭐⭐⭐⭐★

I also read Blacktop Wasteland by S.A. Cosby which I really enjoyed. I'm aiming to get a review out for release day on Tuesday. ⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«★

Currently Reading


The Bright Lands by John Fram

I'm planning to start The Bright Lands by John Fram later today!

Recent Acquisitions


The Midnight Lullaby by Cheryl Low

Many, many thanks to Grinning Skull Press for sending me out a copy of The Midnight Lullaby by Cheryl Low. (And thank you to Tammy for putting this author/book on my radar!)

Burn Our Bodies Down by Rory Powers Devil's Creek by Todd Keisling Murder Ballads by John Hornor Jacobs

I had a few highly anticipated orders arrive last week!! These are all must read authors for me!

Burn Our Bodies Down by Rory Powers - After loving Wilder Girls {my review}, I had to read her new release!

Devil's Creek by Todd Keisling - I absolutely loved The Final Reconciliation {my review} so I'm looking forward to reading Devil's Creek. The reviews have been spectacular for this one so I'm even more excited.

Murder Ballads by John Hornor Jacobs - I'm also a big John Hornor Jacobs fan having loved Southern Gods {my review}, A Lush and Seething Hell {my review}, and his Incarcerado series {my review} which I need to return to some day!

Current Distractions


Hamilton

Are you guys watching Hamilton? I've seen it 5 times in the last week and a half. That's normal right? ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Silver Linings PlaybookThe Exterminating Angel Eurovision

I finally watched Silver Linings Playbook. ⭐⭐⭐⭐★

The Exterminating Angel is a Spanish movie from 1962. It's very Twilight Zone-ish, and I loved it. A group of people are having a dinner party and they just stay. No one can leave the room they are in. The audio is in Spanish, but I believe the subtitles were in English. ⭐⭐⭐⭐★

I also watched Eurovision. I really enjoyed it - it was a great quarantine escape - but I didn't love it as much as everyone else seems to have loved it. ⭐⭐⭐★★

Iron Man The Incredible Hulk Iron Man 2 Thor
Captain America: The First Avenger The Avengers Iron Man 3 Thor: The Dark World
Captain America: The Winter Soldier Guardians of the Galaxy

Are we friends on Letterboxd? I've come to rely on Letterboxd so much for selecting and tracking movies. When I'm in the mood for a certain genre of movie, I'll search by genre and filter for movies I haven't seen. Every single time I would search a genre that wasn't horror, all of the top choices were Marvel movies. I'm giving up and giving in and I'm watching them all in order. I'm attempting to rank them (it's not easy, there's so many) as I go.

These are my ratings so far if anyone is curious!

Iron Man (rewatch) ⭐⭐⭐⭐★
The Incredible Hulk ⭐⭐⭐★★
Iron Man 2 (rewatch) ⭐⭐⭐★★
Thor (rewatch) ⭐⭐⭐⭐★ - I enjoyed it more this time.
Captain America: The First Avenger ⭐⭐πŸ’«★★
The Avengers ⭐⭐⭐⭐★
Iron Man 3 ⭐⭐⭐★★ - The first half was 5 stars, the second half was 1 star.
Thor: The Dark World ⭐⭐⭐⭐★
Captain America: The Winter Soldier ⭐⭐⭐πŸ’«★
Guardians of the Galaxy (rewatch) ⭐⭐⭐⭐★
Avengers: Age of Ultron ⭐⭐πŸ’«★★

So what about you? Let me know what you're reading (or watching) this week or leave me some links!


This post is being shared as part of Book Date's It's Monday! What Are You Reading? and Caffeinated Book Reviewer's The Sunday Post.

Jennifer

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